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Gender Specific Risk Factors (II)

 

Diabetes is a more significant risk factor in women [11]

  • Quadruples the risk of developing heart disease in women [5]

    Doubles the risk of developing heart disease in men [5]

  •  Women may have increased LV wall thickness relative to men with diabetes mellitus [11]

  •  Women suffer greater wall thickening as glucose tolerance worsens [12]

 

Alcohol and tobacco

  • More likely to be abused by men with HF [10]

  • Men have a higher prevalence of alcoholic cardiomyopathy

  • Female smokers have a 1.57 times greater risk for developing cardiovascular disease than men who smoke [4].

Gender Specific Risk Factors (III)

1.Female HF patients are more likely to have a history of:
Renal insufficiency
Cardiomyopathy
Atrial flutter
2.Female HF patients are more likely to have a history of:
Hypothyroidism
Percutaneous coronary intervention
Alcohol or tobacco use
3.Female HF patients are more likely to have a history of:
Coronary bypass surgery
Hyperthyroidism
Chronic liver disease
4.Female HF patients are more likely to have a history of:
Depression
Dyslipidemia
Ischemic stroke

 

Risk Factors Review

 

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4. American Heart Association. Heart and Stroke Statistical Update. Dallas, Tex: American Heart Association; 2002.

5. Haffner S. Management of dyslipidemia in adults with diabetes (technical review). Diabetes Care. 1998;1:160-178.

10. Ho KK, Pinsky JL, Kannel WB, Levy D. The epidemiology of heart failure: the Framingham study. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1993;22:6A-13A.

11. Jessup, M. and Pina, I. L. Is it important to examine gender differences in the epidemiology and outcome of severe heart failure? The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 2004;127:5 1247-52

12. Pijna, IL, Buchter C. Heart Failure in Women. Cardiology in Review. 2003;11(6):337-344.

All references for this section